They're made from parts of certain plants like leaves, herbs, barks, and rinds. Makers use different methods to concentrate them into oils. You may add them to vegetable oils, creams, or bath gels. Or you might smell them, rub them on your skin, or put them in your bath. Some research shows that they can be helpful, if you know how to use them the right way. Always check the label and ask your doctor if you’re not sure if they’re OK for you to use.

As an anti-aging antioxidant. Oregano oil’s high antioxidant content makes it perfect for fighting the effects of aging, which is all about free radicals creating havoc throughout the body. If using it topically, be sure to dilute as described below because oregano can be a “hot” oil when applied to the skin. Always avoid the skin around the eyes and other sensitive areas.
I made a concoction that kept cats from peeing in my bushes… Probably work for squirrles too. Put water and a couple drops of dish soap (to help it stick) in spray bottle… Add cayenne pepper, shake and spray. Or sometimes I just put the cayenne pper and some pepper flakes in dirt around and left it at that. If it rains you will have to re-apply, of course. Hope it helps.
Assist upper respiratory infections and ease asthma attacks. Eucalyptus oil’s anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, and anti-phlegm properties work very quickly to open congested airways. Make a steam inhalation by boiling two cups of water, pour it into a large bowl, then let it cool for five minutes. Add a drop or two of eucalyptus oil. Then create a tent from a small towel draped over your head. Place your face over the bowl and carefully breathe in the vapor until you get some relief. This should only take a couple of minutes. This is great for bronchitis, head colds, chest colds, and asthma.
Properties: Traditionally, camomile essential oil has been used for almost anything you can imagine, including its use as an anti-spasmodic, antiseptic, antibiotic, antidepressant, anti-neuralgic, antiphlogistic, carminative, cholagogue, cicatrisant, emenagogue, analgesic, febrifuge, hepatic, sedative, nervine, digestive, tonic, bactericidal, sudorific, stomachic, anti-inflammatory, anti-infectious, vermifuge, and vulnerary.
The information provided on this Web site, through its social media networks and in supporting materials and communications is intended for basic, general informational purposes only. It is not intended as medical advice and it does not include all possible precautions, side effects, or interactions that may occur. Neither AromaWeb, LLC nor its founder take responsibility for how you use the information provided. Statements contained on AromaWeb have not been evaluated by the FDA. You should conduct thorough research via multiple sources and consult directly with a qualified doctor before using any essential oil or product. Information on AromaWeb must not be relied upon for medical, legal, financial or other decisions.
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